#8 Experts Share Their Valuable Knowledge With You

This Forum invites a number of experts to be a guest for one week and control discussions on specific topics. The public can gain a great deal of free information from reading the posts, but only members may write posts, add to discussions and ask and answer questions. I hope that everyone enjoys the forums and topics that will be featured.
Barbara Gabogrecan
President

Re: #8 Experts Share Their Valuable Knowledge With You

Postby Linda Black » Wed Oct 17, 2012 4:06 pm

Wednesday
Image
Just because we look all grown up doesn't mean we truly are! Somewhere inside is a child, still centre stage at times - mostly when we least want it!!

How can this still be happening? And what can we do about it?

You are probably aware of a number of personality systems that provide guidance and insight to this sort of thing. One of the systems which has been around for many, many years with a long oral tradition is the Enneagram (Any-a-gram). It can be utilised in many ways including for spiritual development. However, today I'm going to focus on the way in which it provides some understanding about why you can still be triggered after all these years and also how you can use it to improve your relationships.

Consider this, when a baby is born it is utterly and literally in need of love and safety. It simply won't survive and thrive without both of those fundamental human needs.

As a toddler the child begins to learn how to get those essential needs met, depending on the specific experiences any given child has and their parents' nurturing styles and attitudes. So, the toddler learns how to behave to get the responses he or she needs in order to feel loved and safe. Fine, they do a great job. They're quick and effective learners.

The problem is that, that behaviour becomes unconscious and so automatic that it's never re-examined for its suitability as an adult. So we still keep doing the same thing we did then - a little differently, true. But essentially the same thing. And the goal is still the same too. We continue to need to feel loved and safe. We're human. It goes with the territory!

The Enneagram identifies and explains those basic behaviours - essentially 9 of them. Of course, as with all systems, there are intricacies and complexities. But I'll stick to the bare bones for clarity and include the basic desire and basic fear of each type. In the second post I'll describe the best qualities of each and what they need to do to develop them.

Type 1 - The Perfectionist. "If I just get it right all will be well". Think of Puritans. Getting it right is the only way and not only that, there's only one right way - "I know what that is" - and everyone else should do it too. Otherwise the world just isn't safe. Basic Desire - to be good, to have integrity, to be balanced. Basic fear - of being bad, imbalanced, defective, corrupt.

Type 2 - The Helper. These are the people-pleasers. I must be so essential in your life that you can't get by without me. You need me so that makes me safe and loved. Problem is they provide that help with strings; they expect to be cared for in the same way - at some point. If that's not forthcoming - woe betide you!! There's a debt involved and you didn't know it. Basic desire - to feel love. Basic fear - of being unloved

Type 3 - The Achiever - these are the workaholics. Winner at any price! What they do, produce, achieve proves their worth and if they are worth something then they'll be safe and loved (so they think). It's all about image and prestige. Feelings count for nothing. Actions and goals are everything. Basic desire - to feel valuable. Basic fear - being worthless.

Type 4 - The Individualist - It's about being valued (safe and loved) for their uniqueness, specialness. They are very introspective and can be moody, brooding and melancholic. Unlike the 3s, emotion is everything! Think of a drama queen. Basic desire - to be themselves. Basic fear - havng no significance or identity

Type 5 - The Observer - Emotions are bad, dangerous too unpredictable so they shut them off, especially in public. They can become distant and hard to connect with. They learned it was safer not to get involved and they process emotions by thinking them rather than feeling them! Think of a stereotypical unemotional scientist. Basic desire - to be capable and competent. Basic fear - being overwhelmed, incompetent, helpless

Type 6 - The Questioner - they feel very unsafe and can either be very risk-averse or in the awful uncertainty become rash - 'Any action is better than this tension!' They can be untrusting and suspicious on the one hand and look to authority for safety, following rules unquestioningly on the other (imagine large organisations or cults). Think of a mine-sweeper! 'There are bombs here somewhere, if I keep looking I'll eventually find them!' Basic desire - to have security and support. Basic fear - being without support and guidance

Type 7 - The Enthusiast - They want to keep things light, breezy, happy. Optimists and dilettants they dislike commitment and being tied down in any way. They avoid bad feelings and love fun, enjoyment, pleasure. They learned that if they keep the mood up they'll be valued. Basic desire - to be satisfied and content. Basic fear - being trapped in pain and deprivation

Type 8 - The Challenger - these are powerful people and they know it and everyone else can feel it! They have no trouble expressing anger and using - and abusing - power. Being in control is everything. No-one else is going to control them, it's the only way to be respected (not loved, in their language) and safe. They can be very scary! Basic desire - to protect themselves. Basic fear - being harmed, controlled, violated

Type 9 - The Peacemaker - They learned that if they maintain the peace they'll be valued and everything will be fine. They forget themselves in the pursuit of peace but over time that sacrifice starts to fester and they can become passive-aggressive. Basic desire - peace of mind and wholeness. Basic fear - of loss, separation and fragmentation.

See if you can identify yourself and the possible type of someone you care for (remembering about their underlying motivation being all important). In my next post I'll provide a link to a pretty reliable test you can do to work this out.
Linda Black
Linda is a Clinical Hypnotherapist who also uses the Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFT, also known as tapping) to produce personal change.
http://www.insightingpeace.com
Linda Black
 
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Re: #7 Experts Share Their Valuable Knowledge With You

Postby Greg Chapman » Wed Oct 17, 2012 4:15 pm

Barbara Gabogrecan wrote:1. There must be a leader and a follower. As in everything in life, there needs to be only one chief and a number of indians. As long as the 'follower' agrees that the other is the leader, then things will work out well. But even though there is a partnership, one of the partners (not both) needs to lead. This person is usually the one who is more entrepreneurial while the other tends to have strengths as a manager/technician.


Barbara, you are right. In the book I have a chapter called "Who's the Boss" that goes into this topic in detail, and how to balance the role of Boss on a day-to-day basis with their joint ownership at board level. It can be made to work well if you get the structure right.
May Your Business Be - As You Plan It!

Dr Greg Chapman - The Profit Whisperer
http://www.empowersolutions.com.au

Author of Married to the Business: Honey I love you but our business sucks http://www.MarriedtotheBusiness.com.au

The Five Pillars of Guaranteed Business Success http://www.FivePillarsBusinessSuccess.com

Price: How to Charge More Without Losing Sales http://www.IncreaseYourPrices.com.au
Greg Chapman
 
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Re: #7 Experts Share Their Valuable Knowledge With You

Postby Linda Black » Wed Oct 17, 2012 6:08 pm

Wednesday
Image
Post 2
Each Enneagram Type is still performing the childhood behaviour (of the Type) to get their need met. Let me give you an example. My Mum was a Type 1.

She was certain she knew what was right and what was not and if everyone would just do the right thing her world would be safe.She used to insist that if she did something then it was only proper that other people should do that too. She had no qualms about telling people that! She demanded that people do the 'right' thing. "Should" was a regular word with her. Worth knowing that she was brought up during the war in England and compliance and safety were very real, everyday concerns then. On the upside she was very moral, honest, genuine, committed and reliable. If she agreed to do something you could be certain she'd do it no matter how inconvenient it might be. You knew exactly where you stood with her, there was no pretense or facade.

I'm a Type 6 and 'be prepared' would have to be my motto! Mostly, be prepared for the worst!!
I've learned to let go a lot now and to trust myself so that I don't have to look to authority (in its many forms) for security. It's been a long and challenging road, but well worth it! I used to plan for all eventualities. 'If this doesn't work then I'll do that and if that doesn't work then I'll try this other way........' I was always on the alert for unexploded bombs everywhere. I'm more of a risk-taker Type 6 (still not much of a risk-taker compared to other Types though). I'm more inclined to leap, rather than keep hopping around not deciding, because of the tension of the uncertainty!

So, what can be gained from all this?
Each Type has a set of strengths and as we become more integrated and resolve the fear they become more available to us and our liberation. In addition, the attribute we've mastered all these years which we've used in pursuit of our need can be utilised for a larger purpose

Type 1 (Perfectionist) - Wise, discerning and patient. To progress toward this they need to become aware when they are value-judging and condemning themselves (yes, they do that too!) or others. It is helpful for them to identify a higher purpose and live for that and to lighten up a bit. Developed attribute - They provide a sound moral compass in the world

Type 2 (Helper) - Unconditionally loving,truly charitable (think Mother Theresa), altruistic, unselfish and gracious. To progress toward this they need to notice when they are giving themselves to others and to nurture themselves and acknowledge that it's OK to have needs themselves. It's helpful for them to recognise their true feelings (especially the aggressive ones) about themselves and others.
Developed attribute - They can demonstrate genuine loving kindness in the world

Type 3 (Achiever) - having genuine ideals, sincere, inner-directed. modest (think quiet achiever) To progress toward this they need to notice when they are trying to be other than they genuinely are and feel empty and self-rejecting. It's helpful for them to become committed to something greater than themselves and set an example for others at the same time, esteeming and valuing them. Developed attribute - They can demonstrate what dedication, focus and achievement can achieve in the world.

Type 4 (Individualist) - Inspired, engaged, have vitality, spontaneous. To progress toward this they need to notice when they're making negative comparisons and move from self-absorption to principled action. To focus on something objective, beyond their feelings or imagination. Developed attribute - They can inspire emotional inspiration to catalyse change in the world

Type 5 (Observer) - Pioneering, visionary, attentive, perceptive. To progress toward this they need to recognise their physical presence, their feelings and needs. Realise they don't have to know every single thing before they act, that they can solve problems as they arise and that they can gain confidence from connection with the world. Developed attribute - They can be emotionally detached enough to assist in stressful situations without getting caught up in them.

Type 6 (Questioner) - Intrepid, decisive, secure, grounded, self-affirming, courageous. To progress toward this they need to recognise their ambivalence towards people, the support they receive from others and also their own inner guidance and when they are becoming dependant on something external for support. As they become more emotionally open and receptive to others they become more independent yet closer to them. Developed Attribute - They have the courage to go against the status quo for a worthwhile cause without the need for recognition, especially in collaboration with others.

Type 7 (Enthusiast) - Joyful, nourished, content, truly free. To progress toward this they need to recognise when they start to feel personal emotional pain and anxiety and when they're anticipating the next distraction to assuage it. To become involved with things in depth and shift their focus of attention to the world and that it exists for more than just their gratification. Developed attribute - They are enthusiastic and able to keep the mood high in the darker phases of a project or venture, satisfied by enjoyment, good times and interesting engagement.

Type 8 (Challenger) - Heroic, inspiring, strong and gentle together, faithful, merciful and magnanimous. To progress toward this they need to recognise their own vulnerability and need for nurturing too. To notice when they're trying to control life. They can learn to use their power to nurture others and know that they can be powerful in the service of others. Developed attribute - They bring true leadership with quiet strength, energy and the right amount of forcefulness

Type 9 (Peacemaker) - Self-determining, powerful (in this case, the ability and willingness to act), serene, steady, stable, guileless.
To progress toward this they need to notice when they resist being affected by experiences, when they 'lose touch' with themselves. They can connect with their vitality, engaged with reality, flexible, adaptable and capable of dealing with it. They recognise their own strength and capacity. Developed attribute - They are able to be true, personally uninvested negotiators in any situation.

I trust this information guides you to better understand what prompts childish outbursts by you and those close to you and how the default patterns you've mastered all these years can be turned to a real benefit in the world as you develop the more evolved qualities and behaviours of your Type.

This has been a very simplified version of the system and I've drawn upon a variety of sources as well as my own experience and understanding. If you would like to explore the Enneagram further and take the free test you can begin here http://www.insightingpeace.com/Enneagram.html. I will also be making a presentation on the Enneagram this coming Sunday (21/10/12) at an expo at the Eley Park Community Centre, 87 Eley Rd, Blackburn South around noon.
Linda Black
Linda is a Clinical Hypnotherapist who also uses the Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFT, also known as tapping) to produce personal change.
http://www.insightingpeace.com
Linda Black
 
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Re: #7 Experts Share Their Valuable Knowledge With You

Postby Frances Cahill » Wed Oct 17, 2012 10:26 pm

Thank you for the vote of confidence Barb! I will be using Word Press. I am rather sad at abandoning my Emerald site for the present. But I have chosen to relaunch now with the new site and go back to the previous one to revamp when time permits. (!)
Frances Cahill
BA (Hons) 1st Cert IV TAA Cert IV Small Business Management
Business communication specialist, writer, trainer, author of LOL is not lots of love
http://www.askauntem.com.au
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Aunt-Em/482360368464994
Frances Cahill
 
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Re: #7 Experts Share Their Valuable Knowledge With You

Postby Barbara Gabogrecan » Thu Oct 18, 2012 6:17 am

Linda - how interesting! Can one person be a combination of types? I feel that I am clearly three of the types you describe (but then, I am a Gemini!) Good luck with your presentation on Sunday.
Barb
Barbara Gabogrecan assists HBB's to market their business online
http://www.HomeBasedBusinessAustralia.org

Barbara is an artist specialising in silk painting; her video is on page one of You Tube http://youtu.be/1ZA9HObN_Go
http://www.SilkPaintingByGabogrecan.com/

Having survived a stroke and a brain tumour, Barbara wrote a book titled 'Thank God I Had a Stroke' to motivate and inspire others suffering from similar afflictions.
http://GabogrecanStrokeRecovery.com/
Barbara Gabogrecan
 
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Re: #7 Experts Share Their Valuable Knowledge With You

Postby Barbara Gabogrecan » Thu Oct 18, 2012 6:38 am

Frances, Wordpress is a simple yet effective platform. Are you setting it up more as a website, or as a blog (which it is mainly used for)?

If you intend keeping your original site, then you should consider using the same 'domain name/blog' e.g. you can go to www.HomeBasedBusinessAustralia.org or www.HomeBasedBusinessAustralia.org/blog - when you do this, Google will combine the two domain names (which are virtually the same) to rank your website and/or blog.

If you want to get rid of the original site (you may copy the content into a word document and use it in your new site) you can point the old domain name to the new site e.g. You can go to this new site with the new domain name www.HomeBasedBusinessAustralia.org or if you go to the old domain name www.hbba.biz it will open up at the new site; you then don't have to worry about old contacts not being able to find your website. However, If you use the same domain name for the new site as you had for the old site, you will lose any page ranking that it previously had.

While discussing domain names - please don't use your business name - rather use a main keyword in the domain name, that people search on and has a search volume of less than 20,000 (if too high the competition will be too great) . This is considered VERY IMPORTANT when Google comes to rank your site. You can watch a video on Keywords (if you are uncertain what one is the best for your business or if you don't know where to place them) http://keywordseotips.com

Cheers
Barb
Barbara Gabogrecan assists HBB's to market their business online
http://www.HomeBasedBusinessAustralia.org

Barbara is an artist specialising in silk painting; her video is on page one of You Tube http://youtu.be/1ZA9HObN_Go
http://www.SilkPaintingByGabogrecan.com/

Having survived a stroke and a brain tumour, Barbara wrote a book titled 'Thank God I Had a Stroke' to motivate and inspire others suffering from similar afflictions.
http://GabogrecanStrokeRecovery.com/
Barbara Gabogrecan
 
Posts: 341
Joined: Sun May 03, 2009 12:57 pm

Re: #7 Experts Share Their Valuable Knowledge With You

Postby Barbara Gabogrecan » Thu Oct 18, 2012 6:42 am

Greg - I really do want to read your book - but as I can't read, I will have to get Peter to read it 'bit by bit' for me as we find some time. It was hard enough finding time to read when I could read! It sounds really great. I wish you well with both the promotion and selling of the book.
Barb
Barbara Gabogrecan assists HBB's to market their business online
http://www.HomeBasedBusinessAustralia.org

Barbara is an artist specialising in silk painting; her video is on page one of You Tube http://youtu.be/1ZA9HObN_Go
http://www.SilkPaintingByGabogrecan.com/

Having survived a stroke and a brain tumour, Barbara wrote a book titled 'Thank God I Had a Stroke' to motivate and inspire others suffering from similar afflictions.
http://GabogrecanStrokeRecovery.com/
Barbara Gabogrecan
 
Posts: 341
Joined: Sun May 03, 2009 12:57 pm

Re: #7 Experts Share Their Valuable Knowledge With You

Postby Geoff Haw » Thu Oct 18, 2012 1:19 pm

Thursday
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Essential Rites for Writing Right – Part 1

So – what rites do you have to write right?

While most readers would agree that there is no exclusive way in which to write, I have found that the adoption of selected standard procedures has been beneficial in producing quality prose.

I like to be very clear on what I am on about. If it’s a University essay, exactly what is required? If it’s not a University essay, still the question is, exactly what is required? I guess it’s called writing with the end in mind – so that the readers will have understood the purpose of and message in the writing.

For the purposes of the context of this blog, I use the following definitions: Rite = formal procedure or routine; Write = compose and create; and Right = correct. So we’re talking about using established routines of how to compose or create written passages that are right, in the sense that they accurately deliver the intended message.

When I’m writing a piece, whether brief or extensive, I clarify in my mind the context and purpose of the article, and build a mental scaffold onto which I can incorporate detail. Structure is important. In a sense, it’s a little like writing an effective speech. A great and attention-getting opening arouses your interest and succinctly outlines what’s coming.

The body of the article evolves from that, giving substance and strength to the central thesis, building up to a logical conclusion – which should be memorable, to give a ‘prop’ on which listeners can recall what you have discussed.

A conclusion that is literally a ‘call to action’ often works well. For example, you may have written of the many benefits for you and a group, the value of membership of some organisation. The key message is, it’s well worth joining up, for both you and the organisation. But don’t just leave a hint - a call to action that follows this up takes the form of a challenge, such as ‘You know the benefits of membership, so do yourself a favour and phone 1300 456 234 to register as a member today.’

Writing right is not judged on a single quality. Obviously, the story should develop progressively, building up to a clear conclusion. However, the clean skin of a manuscript cannot afford to have acne-like blemishes, as it were. What are these blemishes? How about poor sentence structure, oblique meanings, spelling and punctuation errors, and unimaginative or repetitive choice of words, to list a few.

But wait – there’s more! It’s of small comfort when you have created your ‘literary masterpiece’ that brilliantly covers and delivers the message accurately and with aplomb – yet readers find it difficult to wade through.

Much will be lost in the reading if the presentation isn’t clear. We’ve all seen examples, such as a very small font, lack of clarity in the printing, poor quality print, formatting that is less than ideal e.g. overcrowding of the page in a desperate effort to get as much as possible in a given space. Margins actually protect the appearance of the text, much in the same way that a frame complements a picture.

Some fonts lend themselves to easy reading; others not so. Do you use fully justified text for a neat appearance, or left justified so that spaces between words are even? If you’re writing for senior citizens, don’t waste your time using Times Roman 10 font!

The next posting continues to explore the basics for effective writing. I hope you’ll come along for the ride.

Very best wishes, Geoff
______________________________________________
Dr Geoff Haw
Managing Director, Write Your Life Story

PO Box 4007
Narre Warren South 3805
Landline: 03 5998 4932 Mobile: 0418 580 081
geoff@writeyourlifestory.com.au http://www.writeyourlifestory.com.au
Turning lives into books: Passing on family history
Geoff Haw
 
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Re: #7 Experts Share Their Valuable Knowledge With You

Postby Geoff Haw » Thu Oct 18, 2012 2:08 pm

Thursday
Image
Essential Rites for Writing Right – Part 2

Thanks for continuing your interest in writing right!

We’ve all seen writers who like to show off their incredible range of vocabulary. Certainly, use of the right word to convey a specific meaning is valuable, but big or oblique words don’t necessarily impress. To ensure your message is clear to the reader, keep it simple! Not everyone reads with a massive dictionary at arm’s length!

As a Johann Wolfgang von Goethe declared, "If any man wishes to write in a clear style, let him first be clear in his thoughts."

Why do you write? Thus says Sholem Asch, "Writing comes more easily if you have something to say." As Sam Kekovich would say, ‘You know it makes sense!’

Readers tend to lose the main point of long, run-on sentences. I suggest you help readers stay focused by creating shorter sentences. Gracián, a 17th century Jesuit writer, claimed, "Good things, when short, are twice as good."

Last week, I came across some writing hints that are self-evident but economical, published by WebAIM (Web Accessibility in Mind), targeted to expanding the web's potential for people with disabilities. I reckon this (edited) list is pretty useful. What do you think?
• Write clearly and simply
• Organize your ideas logically, before and during the writing process
• Stick to the point
• Make it interesting
• Write for your target audience
• Assume readers are intelligent, but not that they know the subject as well as you
• Write cohesive paragraphs constructed around a single major idea
• Avoid slang and jargon
• Minimise acronyms and abbreviations – avoid Acronym City!
• If writing dialogue, take care to make it natural rather than contrived.
• Use familiar words and combinations of words
• Use active voice
• Avoid weak verbs
• Use positive terms; avoid multiple negatives
• Check the spelling
• Write short sentences
• Ensure that every word and paragraph is necessary
• When you're finished, stop!

It is not easy to write clearly and simply, but it is important to try. Users are more likely to understand your writing if you take the time to organize your thoughts and write them in the clearest, simplest form possible. To maximize understandability, limit the text, add appropriate illustrations, and avoid indirect or implied meanings (such as sarcasm or parody). In the end, nearly everyone benefits from clarity and simplicity.

It is also worth sleeping on your writing, and re-visiting it next day for an edit.

If you follow these suggestions, you will develop rites that ensure that you will write right!

Finally, here’s your call to action: Post a response that shares some of your own experiences when writing, in the light of the above. I dare you to! It’s too easy to just exit!

Best wishes, Geoff
______________________________________________
Dr Geoff Haw
Managing Director, Write Your Life Story
PO Box 4007, Narre Warren South 3805
Landline: 03 5998 4932 Mobile: 0418 580 081
geoff@writeyourlifestory.com.au http://www.writeyourlifestory.com.au
Turning lives into books: Passing on family history
Geoff Haw
 
Posts: 40
Joined: Sun May 03, 2009 1:52 pm

Stepping Outside Your Comfort Zone

Postby Robyn O'Connell » Fri Oct 19, 2012 1:02 am

Friday
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Outside The Box


How often is it that we get stuck?

Our business is going along very nicely thank you very much - but does that mean we should stay content to be there?

What happens when YOU are the sole operator of your business (as I am) and so there are only so many hours in the day, so many funerals I can perform in a week, that is just a fact - how do you expand that?

Then you have an idea! One that grows from being an 'expert' in your area.

After being asked to do some sessional lectures on funeral celebrancy for two different training organisations, I was surprised to learn that the 'trainers' who were conducting the training, were not funeral celebrants! In fact they do as many funerals as I do weddings and I certainly don't have the experience to train people in weddings. Now I will hear people saying, a good trainer can train in anything and while that may be true, who would you want to learn from - a mechanic who has been working on cars for 10 years, or one who finished his apprenticeship and then started training others?

So I thought I would 'bite the bullet' and not just apply to teach through a training organisation, but rather start my own training course. With a Memorandum of Understanding with a Registered Training Organization, so that students could get 3 nationally recognised units in case they want to use them for further study in celebrancy or associated fields, I wrote the entire course - a six day live in course - total immersion! It only took every spare moment for six months of my life!

All the while I was moaning to the 'powers that be' that this wasn't right and that wasn't good enough - the result of that is that I am now on the SMEG (subject matter expert group - in my case funeral celebrancy) who are reporting to the IRG (industry reform group) who are reviewing the whole Certificate IV in Celebrancy. Next time I think I'll keep my mouth closed as if they do too many changes I'll be spending another six months writing a new curriculum!!!

I had to make a decision - I had to forgo some income from my regular celebrancy work, in order to not only promote my 'new business' but to speak at conferences and seminars to get recognised interstate (I'm relatively well known in Victoria). It has cost me a lot, in time, in effort and money! But this realistically is a NEW business, yes it is in my field, but it is new - there are costs to set up, projectors, screens, training resources, it was like starting all over again! Although I didn't have a full training class for my first course, it was extremely successful and the testimonials were more than worth not making any money on it - mind you I didn't make a loss - pretty good for a first time venture I think! I already have people wanting to book in for next year - as well as requests for one day seminars. In fact I'm off to Perth at the end of November to do a two day workshop, I haven't even advertised yet and I already have 2 of the 10 I need.

When people used to ask me what am I going to do to increase business, I used to say "I can't do anything, there is only one of me and I can't spread myself further than what I have".... what had happened is that I was only looking inside the box, not daring to peek outside because it seemed easier to stay inside the box! But at the same time, it has taken me 10 years to get the expertise I needed to take that next step. I then had to study (again) to get my Certificate IV in Training and Assessment.

So my question to you is this - "are you staying inside the box because it is safe and secure?"

Do you think (like I did) that because there is only one of you and you are your business that it can't expand?

Are you an expert in your area and have you taken advantage of that expertise? Speaking at conferences and seminars lifts your profile and initially if you have to do it for nothing, do it! Often you might not get paid but you will get to attend the conference for nothing - that is being paid - just in kind!

It is easy to sometimes stay in our 'box' - it is safe, warm and comfortable - stepping outside can be scary! But you know there is a big world out there and they say the world is your oyster!

As I sit here finishing this post, I suddenly realised that I have not read Geoff Haw's post (a fellow celebrant) on writing right - oh my goodness I hope I have!!! :)

Enjoy your day :)
Robyn

Robyn O'Connell CMC, Dip MC, FC, Cert IV Training & Assessment
Celebrant, Author and Funeral Celebrant and Workplace Trainer
Silver Celebrants
http://www.silvercelebrants.com.au
0425 726 246
robyn@silvercelebrants.com.au
Robyn O'Connell
 
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