Welcome Warren Harmer Business planning Why What When How

This Forum invites a number of experts to be a guest for one week and control discussions on specific topics. The public can gain a great deal of free information from reading the posts, but only members may write posts, add to discussions and ask and answer questions. I hope that everyone enjoys the forums and topics that will be featured.
Barbara Gabogrecan
President

Welcome Warren Harmer Business planning Why What When How

Postby Barbara Gabogrecan » Wed Jul 10, 2013 5:34 pm

ImageWarren has quite a different approach to solving business problems and will discuss some of his methods in his posts tis week on the topic of "Business Planning: The Why, What, When and How".

Warren has a Ph.D in science and fell into the world of small business by accident. But he had found his passion and his experience on owning a business and consulting to small business operators now spans over 17 years.

Since Warren doesn't have formal business training he doesn't apply formal business theories, but he solve problems using a scientific approach. Warren has found that practical, hands-on advice for small business owners is sorely lacking, since most ‘experts’ have never owned a business. He has also found that most business information is targeted to big business with many employees. I am sure that most of you can relate to this!

Warren's objective is to offer instructive, ‘how to’ information to make business ownership easier, less stressful and more enjoyable. He gets enormous satisfaction from helping business owners. The relationships he builds are quite personal and therefor much more relevant than one would expect.

To get the best out of what our expert offers this week, it would be an idea to present him with some of your problems and see what suggestions he can offer you.

Barb
Barbara Gabogrecan assists HBB's to market their business online
http://www.HomeBasedBusinessAustralia.org

Barbara is an artist specialising in silk painting; her video is on page one of You Tube http://youtu.be/1ZA9HObN_Go
http://www.SilkPaintingByGabogrecan.com/

Having survived a stroke and a brain tumour, Barbara wrote a book titled 'Thank God I Had a Stroke' to motivate and inspire others suffering from similar afflictions.
http://GabogrecanStrokeRecovery.com/
Barbara Gabogrecan
 
Posts: 341
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Small Business Planning: the Why, What, When and How

Postby Warren Harmer » Mon Jul 15, 2013 1:10 pm

Consulting is an interesting profession, not least because you are granted permission to look where others aren’t allowed. Small business owners are extremely private about what goes on behind the counter, yet my clients have let me poke, prod, peer and dissect their businesses. They have laid it all bare: the good and the bad: their triumphs, failings and incompetencies. It’s like the business edition of Embarrassing Bodies. In fact one client joked that our meetings were “business confessions”.

One of the stock-standard question that any consultant would ask very early on is about business plans...”have you ever had a business plan?” or “do you have a business plan?” Responses vary little, with an overwhelming majority falling into the “no” basket. Of the many hundreds of businesses I have asked this question, I estimate the 5% of you ever had a business plan of any description. Of those, even less ever looked at it again after it was finished. Even fewer use planning as an ongoing business practice - my guess is less than 1% do any regular kind of structured review, discussion or planning.

If only 1% of business owners do any kind of planning, you would imagine that the process must be like climbing Mt Everest and there must be some big, costly and difficult obstacles. After all, owing a business is probably the most financially risky thing that you will ever do. If you bought shares in a high risk company or an investment property you would probably do lots of homework, due diligence and consult some people in the know. Yet with small business there is a brazen naïve optimism that things will “all work out”.

I do wonder why business planning is so lax. Is it laziness? Is it the perceived cost? Perhaps it is overtired-ness at the end of a busy week. Lack of time is also a convenient excuse. It could be that business owners don’t know how to do business planning, feel it has no value to them or just that they can get away without doing it. Reasons will be different for everyone, but there certainly seems to be no compulsion to do it. Countless times I have heard the comment that ‘it’s in my head’ and have then proceeded to extract said business plan and put it on paper. The result? Not much! I didn’t see any detailed costings, budgets market research or industry trends.

The reality is that most of you can get away without it business planning (most of you do) but this lack of strategy in small business is most certainly strangling your growth. From my experiences I would suggest that the biggest obstacle is the mind of the business owner. It’s just not priority and when business demands your time, it always becomes lower priority. Plus things seem to go OK without doing it, so why bother?

During this series of articles on I want to change your mind, to compel you to step away from the daily grind and take a bird’s eye view not just of your business, but of your business landscape. I want you to go to the lookout and see your business in the bigger picture that it lives in. It is the best and easiest way to stop going in circles, define your business direction and decide how you will get there. In this series I will explain the value of business planning, demystify the process, show you how to do it and to demonstrate that it is not so difficult. If I am successful, you will want to create your own plan, review it regularly and implement strategies from your plan every day.
I also want you to define business planning as a practice in your own business. Too often it is spoken about as a one-off activity, but planning is something you should always be doing.
[color=#00BF40]Where to find Dr Warren Harmer
If you would like help with your small business, my business consulting company crecer.com.au
My small business blog: www.big-small-business.com
Facebook: Crecer
Twitter: @warrenharmer
LinkedIn: drwarrenharmer
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Warren Harmer
 
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Re: Welcome Warren Harmer Business planning Why What When How

Postby Barbara Gabogrecan » Mon Jul 15, 2013 2:08 pm

A very interesting start to your week of posts Warren, I certainly do look forward to the remaining posts. I am able to say that I am in that 5% who have had a business plan. Let me tell you why I felt that it was a waste of time. First of all it requires so much 'guess' work when you have a new business that it seems most unrealistic to me. Secondly, things change so rapidly for home based businesses (especially new ones) that the plan becomes irrelevant. Sure, you can keep updating it, but then that time factor really does come into play. I found that I had to spend at least three to four hours most weeks making changes!

But I must share with everyone how I wrote the first business plan (I have written a number) - I was in Sydney at a Trade Fair and when it finished we stayed an extra two days. My husband and I moved into a nice motel in Kings Cross and moved from one outdoor café to another, all day. It was sunny, we did not have to prepare food, answer emails or phones etc. so we were very focused. Everything was progressing well and we enjoyed discussing our plan. That night I accidently poured boiling water over my hand when I went to make a cup of tea. The hotel staff decided to call for a doctor. But none could come because it was the Mardi Gras Festival and no traffic could get through!

So I sat with my hand in a sink of cold water and my husband decided to go onto the roof of the hotel and watch the parade. He was gone for ages and when he returned he explained, the door onto the roof opened from the inside only, so he could not get back in. Eventually he managed to climb down an outside wall into an alley and came back in the front door. I think he was more worried about getting attached in the alley than anything else!

The next day we worked with gusto and managed to complete the business plan. We just had to type it, check some figures and it was done. That is one business plan I will not forget in a hurry!
Barb
Barbara Gabogrecan assists HBB's to market their business online
http://www.HomeBasedBusinessAustralia.org

Barbara is an artist specialising in silk painting; her video is on page one of You Tube http://youtu.be/1ZA9HObN_Go
http://www.SilkPaintingByGabogrecan.com/

Having survived a stroke and a brain tumour, Barbara wrote a book titled 'Thank God I Had a Stroke' to motivate and inspire others suffering from similar afflictions.
http://GabogrecanStrokeRecovery.com/
Barbara Gabogrecan
 
Posts: 341
Joined: Sun May 03, 2009 12:57 pm

Business Planning - The Why

Postby Warren Harmer » Tue Jul 16, 2013 4:05 pm

Imagine that you are about to set off on a very long journey in your car, across a hostile landscape, to a distant destination that you have never visited before. You aren’t sure when you will return (if ever), you don’t have a map, there are no road signs and you only have limited information about the destination. This is the journey of starting your own business, a journey that most of you are already on.

It is possible that you will have a safe, uneventful journey and will seamlessly settle into your new home without any challenges. What is more likely though, is that you will get lost, run into difficulties, run out of fuel and take wrong directions - all of which will cost you money, time and will stress you out.

Would you just get in your car and drive? Or would you plan your journey carefully, map out your route, check on fuel locations, get your car serviced and research your destination first? If you are starting off, not creating a business plan is the equivalent of making this journey totally unprepared.

Those of you already in business will have already made a few wrong turns. For start ups, the process of business planning is about creating the most accurate picture of business before you start it. The more detail, information and knowledge you have, the greater your chances of success. Your business plan is also your chance to dream and to draw your picture of what your business will look like in future.

Business planning is about defining the destination, deciding the safest and easiest route to take, getting advice, researching and understanding an unpredictable landscape. Business planning is not just for start-ups either, as your business journey constantly evolves and market conditions keep changing. Many businesses just travel along, making it up every day and go wherever the business takes them. By knowing your destination, you can actually check to see whether you are going there or not.

Make your mistakes on paper
Business planning is not about creating a perfect document, it is a practice. It is a mindset and routine that forces you out of the trenches for a short time to take a look from above. It is a process of clarifying where you want your business to go and of reviewing and creating strategies to take you there. It is about creating a roadmap and renewing your focus on the long-term.

Some of your business decisions are small operational decisions that just keep your business going, but there are some bigger important decisions that will involve spending money (sometimes lots of it). This could include choosing stock for the next season in your retail store, deciding whether to get a new website, hiring a new staff member, finding a new supplier or doing an advertising campaign. It is so easy to get these decisions wrong and to end up with a bad staff member that scares your customers, no results from your advertising or a nasty tax bill. Trial and error is a very expensive way to work out your business strategy.

The imperative is to make decisions with your eyes wide open, to minimise risks and maximise the chances of success. All business decisions carry risk, but are made more effectively when you take the time to draw out your proposition on paper and see how they might work out.

A travel agent I once worked with was spending a fortune on advertising but didn’t know what to do to achieve better results with lower cost. We conducted research on to find out about her clients, what activities they participated in and what was important to them. We then found other marketing options based on that information and managed to reduce costs by more than 75%.

Staying on track
In the day-to-day pressures of running your business it is very easy to be caught up, spending your time putting our spot fires and losing sight of your destination. Business plans clearly articulate what your vision is, so when you arrive at a fork in the road, you can go back to the road map, reorient yourself and feel more confident that you are going in the right direction. Because you are not just making it up as you go and hoping for the best, you can feel more certain. When you need to make daily operational decisions, you can keep then in line with your overall plan and strategy, because you will know what it is!

One of my engineering clients experienced extreme stress for a six-month period, as the market for qualified, experienced engineers dried up. This became very tough for all of the team who became overworked, communication became reactive and morale dropped. Through a regular sharing and discussing of the business goals to the whole team, they stayed focused all in the right direction and acted cohesively to stay on track until the storm passed.

Business planning is not hard to do, but like any habit, it needs discipline to develop. Not doing it is a wasted opportunity to maximise your chances to grow, to succeed and to build the business that you really want.
[color=#00BF40]Where to find Dr Warren Harmer
If you would like help with your small business, my business consulting company crecer.com.au
My small business blog: www.big-small-business.com
Facebook: Crecer
Twitter: @warrenharmer
LinkedIn: drwarrenharmer
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Warren Harmer
 
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Business Planning: The What and When

Postby Warren Harmer » Wed Jul 17, 2013 1:44 pm

Hopefully by now you are feeling like you should be doing some kind of business planning.. so what next? I have spoken about business planning practices in this series, so I would like to go through the types of activities that you should be doing.

You have probably heard about lots of different business plans such as the ‘one page’ plan, compliance plans or business plans for finance or investors. Each type of business plan will focus on particular content depending on the purpose, for example a business plan aiming to secure finance will have a stronger emphasis on financial performance. You will find many examples online, including several at big-small-business.com and crecer.com.au.

As I have already mentioned, the point of creating a business plan is not to create a nice looking document. It is a process that you undertake to plan, research, learn, strategise, discover, ask questions, identify risks and work out how you will make your business work in the future. During that period you will undergo a personal transformation that will make you a better business owner. Your business plan simply documents everything that you discover and all of the decisions that you will make.

In your planning activities you need to answer these questions:
• What are you trying to achieve in your business? Your long and medium term goals need to be clearly stated and measureable.
• What is your strategy to achieve your goals? Consider resources, people, how much money you need, capacity, risk, sales and marketing.
• What is happening in your business? Do you need to change anything to achieve your goals? What are the obstacles?
• What is happening in your business landscape – industry, market, economy and government changes that may affect you and your strategy?
• Measuring progress: are you moving towards your goals? How will you know?
• What are key activities you need to perform?
• Project your income, costs and cash flow.
• Look at your business strategy, marketing, sales and new developments.
• Look at what worked last year and what didn’t.

Business planning activities will be different for every business, so you refine your own schedule over time. It is important to have a team that are consistently involved over time, so choose your own ‘board’ of experienced business people, owners, senior team members and an external coach or mentor.

New business, struggling business or new venture
For brand new businesses, you will have a lot of research to do, so building your business plan will be a longer, slower process. Ideally you will work with a mentor or business coach who can guide you and knows the right questions to ask. This comprehensive type of business plan is the most thorough and gives you time to learn and develop as you go, with an emphasis on you developing a deeper understanding of how the business might work once it has actually started.

This is also the process you should go through if you are considering a big business decision such as changing your business direction or expanding into new products or markets. This process would also benefit businesses that are struggling, as it will help to define what you are doing and what changes you need to make to turn your business around. Once you have completed your business plan for you new business and have a clearer understanding of what it might look like, you may not like what you see! That’s OK too. If decide not to proceed with your business in that format at that time, that is an equally good outcome. You can re-assess your proposed business model, perhaps delay the start, source more investment or perhaps not start a business at all. The business plan would have achieved its purpose of making you better informed of and maybe saved you a lot of money and stress.

One of my business planning clients was a middle-aged couple that intended to start an art gallery/cafe. They were ready to pay a massive deposit on a property that would involve a substantial financial commitment for many years. Before they started, we created a business plan for their proposal and researched every aspect of their proposed business, including financial viability, council permits, traffic patterns, marketing and the demands of running the business. In the end, the couple decided to start a much simpler, less demanding and lower risk online business.

Business planning for existing businesses
Opening the doors for trade does not mean the end of your business planning. You will move from ‘theory’ mode to ‘operation’ mode, so you will see how it works out in comparison to your plan. For your planning to be valuable to your business ongoing, you need to use it as your roadmap as you run your business. Don’t let it gather dust on a shelf, but refer back to it and measure your progress against the targets and strategies that are described.

Set aside regular time (monthly and weekly) to take a bird’s eye view of the business and look at how your plans are working out, particularly revenue, costs, sales, web traffic and average sales. When your business is not doing what you planned, take time to find out what is happening and to really understand how your business and market operate. This ongoing process of learning is vital to continued growth and survival. Plan to do a major review every year.

On the last day of this series I will present a business planning schedule that is useful for operating businesses.
[color=#00BF40]Where to find Dr Warren Harmer
If you would like help with your small business, my business consulting company crecer.com.au
My small business blog: www.big-small-business.com
Facebook: Crecer
Twitter: @warrenharmer
LinkedIn: drwarrenharmer
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Warren Harmer
 
Posts: 10
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Business planning: The How (Part 1)

Postby Warren Harmer » Thu Jul 18, 2013 1:41 pm

There are many ways to skin the proverbial business planning cat which will depend on the size of your business, how long you have been operating, who is involved and how much revenue you have. The essential elements that you will need to do are:
1. Review your previous plans (if you have one).
2. Analyse your business.
3. Analyse your business landscape.
4. Review the information that you have gathered.
5. Make decisions about your future strategy.
6. Document what you are going to do and the results of your review, including budget and marketing schedule.
7. Create a list of actions that makes everyone accountable.
8. Create a schedule to review your list of actions to make sure they are getting done.
9. Create a schedule of regular meetings dedicated to reviewing progress.

If you haven’t done any kind of business planning before, then it’s probably a good idea to start with a full business plan so you really understand the process, then you can tailor your practices later. That could mean a quarterly review cycle where your ‘board’ get together to review your progress, for example. Equally it could mean a monthly meeting with your decision makers. Whichever way you decide is best for you, it is vital that this is dedicated time, that each attendee is fully prepared, the meeting is chaired and actions are taken from the meeting.

Where to start
From here on I will describe the creation of a conventional business plan so you will know how to get started. Every business plan starts with a template: an empty standard document with each section ordered and prepared for you to add your specific information. There are countless templates available online, some paid, some free. Get one that is aimed at small businesses and is free, such as one available on http://www.big-small-business.com.

Starting at a blank template can feel daunting, so start off by entering everything that you do know, no matter how rough. This helps build some momentum and will automatically show you the ‘holes’ in your knowledge and what you need to research. Get examples of completed business plans first so you can look at how they look when completed.
Work on one section at a time; finish it and then move on to the next one. If you find some useful information for a different section, keep it, park it and come back to it later. There will be a lot of information once you start looking, so take your time, sift through it and just use whatever is relevant to your business. If you encounter questions that you don’t know the answers, don’t just guess. Do actual research: search online, talk to people and get actual quotes when you need prices. Your plan needs to be based on cold hard facts, otherwise it is meaningless. And remember: keep it simple! There is no point having a long complex document that sits on a shelf and gathers dust.

Don’t be afraid to ask
If you haven’t been in business before, it can be difficult to create a plan that is realistic or thorough enough, because you just don’t have the experience or knowledge. In this process you must accept that there are many things that you don’t know you that you don’t know. Business planning is a process of opening your eyes. For this reason, getting external advice or input is essential. Having an experienced businessperson to look at your plan, ask questions or guide you through the process will add considerable value. The aim is to make your plan as realistic as possible, so challenging your assumptions is very important to make sure they are robust and will stand up to the demands of the business world.

The ideal situation is to have an experienced small business consultant work with you to guide you through the process, ask you a lot of questions and give you a sanity check on what you are proposing. For those on a low budget, you may find government-sponsored business mentors who can give you guidance, or you may have friends and family who are experienced in small business that you can ask.

Where to look for information
Getting meaningful information for your business plan needs some know-how and persistence. Big businesses have teams of analysts to dig deep, but you will have to roll up your sleeves and do it yourself. The good news is that the act of finding out information yourself actually makes it more meaningful. Here are some useful places to start:
• Government, business centres, local councils and statistical organisations have good broad data on populations, council plans, traffic, etc. that can be useful for ‘big picture’ information.
• Professional associations are good places for industry-specific news and data.
• General Internet searching will uncover some interesting information, especially if you look specifically into your industry and location.
• Business networks, associations and groups offer good information and great networks of experienced people.
• People in your industry will already know a lot of information that will be of interest to you. If you can find someone already in your type of business from a different city or area that is ideal.
• Your potential customers. Doing surveys is incredibly useful, as it gives you insight into what your customers want.

One business plan I worked on was for a man who wanted to start a retail shop selling nuts. He had already found a retail premises that he was keen on, so I did some research and was lucky enough to find some data on foot traffic for that area (which was very low). As a result of this, I recommended that he keep looking and find a site with higher traffic. Even though he would be paying more rent in a different location, his chances of success were much higher.
[color=#00BF40]Where to find Dr Warren Harmer
If you would like help with your small business, my business consulting company crecer.com.au
My small business blog: www.big-small-business.com
Facebook: Crecer
Twitter: @warrenharmer
LinkedIn: drwarrenharmer
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Warren Harmer
 
Posts: 10
Joined: Wed Jul 10, 2013 5:19 pm

Re: Welcome Warren Harmer Business planning Why What When How

Postby Peter O'Connor » Thu Jul 18, 2013 2:56 pm

As a former accountant, I understand the need for a business plan. I had clients come to me wanting to start a business (usually something they liked, rather than what the market needed) and the hardest part to explain to them and for them to get their heads around was the finances. How do you estimate income and expenses when you have never done this before? They used to say to me "What would you know about this business? Have you ever run one like this?"

When you get a handle on the expense side and then look at how much sales revenue you would need to cover this plus make a profit, a common answer was "But that's too expensive. The customer won't pay that." It's difficult for them to see it from the 'outside' as they feel that they are part of the business. You are right when you say they need to get out of the trenches, but I found it extremely hard to achieve this.

Luckily, I am past this stage in my life now, but I do appreciate what you are trying to do.

Best of luck to you.

Peter
Peter O'Connor, is a retired accountant and is involved with teaching home based businesses how to build and manage their own websites.
http://www.HomeBasedBusinessAustralia.org
Peter O'Connor
 
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Business planning: The How (Part 2)

Postby Warren Harmer » Fri Jul 19, 2013 9:06 am

In today’s instalment I want to delve deeper into a business plan and describe some of the common sections to give you a clearer understanding. This list is by no means exhaustive but will cover most plans. Depending on the purpose of your plan, you may need to include other information that is relevant to the purpose, such as immigration, finance, investors, etc.

Business description.
One of the first sections in your plan, this sets the framework. It provides are concise and clear description of your business that a complete stranger could read it and then understand what you do and what your stand for. This will include sections like Business Overview, Business Concept, Products and services, Vision, Mission, Values and History

S.W.O.T.
Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats – an essential part of any plan.

Your market and industry
Describe your target markets to the highest level of detail that you can. Define your biggest 3-4 markets, then for each one define the geographic area, characteristics, what matters to them, their activities, income levels and any other details of use and peculiarity to that market. Also research what is happening in your industry, your area and (if relevant) the economy as a whole. This will include sections like Target market, industry trends and Competitor Analysis.

Business growth
If you are planning to grow, this section details how you intend to make it happen. Is it through new products, expansion of sales to current clients, online sales, new clients or a wider area? Quantify your targets so you have specific goals to work towards.

Marketing and sales
This section describes your marketing and sales strategy, including marketing fundamentals such as your target market and marketing positioning. You will then go on to detail all marketing activities and measurements. This section will include Marketing positioning, Marketing Materials, Marketing Measurement, Marketing initiatives, Internet marketing, Social media and Sales Strategy.

Operations
If you are planning to change the way your business operates or are a new business then this section will describe how your business will work on a day-day basis and what infrastructure you will need.

Risks
No business exists without risk, especially if you are growing and investing. Detailing your risks enables you to strategise on minimisation and to be ready to deal with them.

Financial projections
Projections are a very detailed month-month estimate of the finances of your business and include sales, cash in, costs and profits. Although they are an estimate, putting them together makes you look at every detail of your business under the microscope, which is a very useful exercise. Even those of you who are afraid of numbers, make the effort to do this as you will understand your business so much better once you have finished. (Get help if you need!)

Start Up Costs
If you are starting a business or investing in new ventures within your current business, it is vital to know the costs to the highest degree of accuracy possible.

Action Plan
Drawing out key tasks and deadlines is very important to being your plan to life.
[color=#00BF40]Where to find Dr Warren Harmer
If you would like help with your small business, my business consulting company crecer.com.au
My small business blog: www.big-small-business.com
Facebook: Crecer
Twitter: @warrenharmer
LinkedIn: drwarrenharmer
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Warren Harmer
 
Posts: 10
Joined: Wed Jul 10, 2013 5:19 pm

Re: Welcome Warren Harmer Business planning Why What When How

Postby Warren Harmer » Fri Jul 19, 2013 8:10 pm

To those of you who have read and commented on my posts this week, thanks for taking the time. I have enjoyed writing them.
Last one tomorrow!

Warren
[color=#00BF40]Where to find Dr Warren Harmer
If you would like help with your small business, my business consulting company crecer.com.au
My small business blog: www.big-small-business.com
Facebook: Crecer
Twitter: @warrenharmer
LinkedIn: drwarrenharmer
[/color]
Warren Harmer
 
Posts: 10
Joined: Wed Jul 10, 2013 5:19 pm

Business planning: The When

Postby Warren Harmer » Sat Jul 20, 2013 8:30 am

In the past 5 days I have described many different activities that could all be categorized under ‘Business Planning’ and keep telling you that it is a practice not a once off activity. To keep on top of it all and make business planning an ongoing (not overwhelming) activity, having a schedule to work by is the only approach.

For your plan to become a useful document it should become a guide that you refer to as you run your business. It is important that smaller actions and tasks are taken from the plan and are transferred into your weekly and monthly activities. You should refer back to it and measure your progress against the targets and strategies that are described. Plan to review it every year. Rather than relying on your memory, have a fixed schedule that utilises reminders, calendars and appointments is essential.

What to do when
Below is an overview of a business review and planning schedule that you should follow; you will tailor this for your business, but whatever schedule you create, stick to it! It is a good idea to create your own ‘board’ of interested and experienced people who can review your progress with you.

Annual
• Review your business plan to see how the year went, in comparison to it. Try to understand the reasons that your business performed differently to your expectations.
• Create a new plan for the upcoming year.
• Determine your major projects for the year.
• Set actions and tasks to achieve objectives.
• Define marketing activities, budgets and initiatives.

Monthly
• Review monthly results compared to your plan and budget.
• Host a monthly ‘board’ review meeting.
• Review tasks and actions from your business plan.
• Implement actions.
• Review new developments.

Daily, weekly
• Review weekly results.
• Ensure tasks, actions and systems are being implemented

If you have created a full business plan, bear in mind that it is never ‘finished’ and you will also have business building tasks to do that you identified in your plan. Create a list to make sure those things happen, with deadlines.

Thanks again for your interest over this week. I hope at the end of this series that you genuinely want business planning to be a part of your business.
[color=#00BF40]Where to find Dr Warren Harmer
If you would like help with your small business, my business consulting company crecer.com.au
My small business blog: www.big-small-business.com
Facebook: Crecer
Twitter: @warrenharmer
LinkedIn: drwarrenharmer
[/color]
Warren Harmer
 
Posts: 10
Joined: Wed Jul 10, 2013 5:19 pm

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