Welcome Steve Osbourne - Golf and the Art of Marketing

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Barbara Gabogrecan
President

Re: Welcome Steve Osborne - Golf and the Art of Marketing

Postby Steve Osborne » Fri Sep 20, 2013 6:20 pm

"Great putt," says your playing partner. "Thanks, pal," as you pick your ball out of the hole and walk off the green, happy in the sunshine and confident that all is right with the world…

BALL IN THE HOLE

You've got the commitment, now do the work. You take care of the client. You do what you said you were going to do. You're ethical and perform to the highest standards of service delivery. You do a great job and make sure you do the little things as well as the big things, like staying in touch and handling any problems promptly. If you don't meet or exceed your client's expectations, you'll never get the chance to benefit from the added bonus of word-of-mouth (WOM) referrals.

INTO THE CLUBHOUSE – REFERRALS

If you’re as good as you say you are, you’ll have a happy client. You'll be sharing a drink at the nineteenth hole and talking about how much you enjoyed the game together.

What's the most effective way to gain new business? WOM referrals. Why? Inexpensive, ideal clients.

In Marketing Golf, a qualified referral feeds directly back into the game. It doesn’t guarantee a sale, but it does enable you to bypass Playing The Drive/Making The Offer. You no longer need to attract the attention of that particular prospect – your playing partner has done it for you.

The moment the work is completed is the obvious time to obtain a referral. If there’s no direct referral, it should be possible to obtain a testimonial. Part of your marketing strategy will be to have appropriate collection methods in place. And there's another ideal time to ask for referrals. It's during the phase after the proposal has been agreed and immediately BEFORE the work takes place.

Here's why. Firstly, your brand new client is in a very happy place. You've just agreed to give him exactly what he wants in the time frame he expects at a price he can afford. You've made his life a whole lot easier and he's in "honeymoon" mode. Even though nothing has actually happened yet, he's imagining how much better his business will soon be.

Now is the time to say: "John, you know we help a lot of businesses just like yours and we're good at what we do, otherwise you wouldn't
have hired us. Who else in the golf club do you know has similar issues/is going through the same difficulty?" Or words to that effect.

Secondly, nothing has yet gone wrong with the project at your end!

I don't know if I even have an aura, man. I just try to win. Tiger Woods US golfer
Last edited by Steve Osborne on Fri Sep 20, 2013 6:37 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Smarthinking helps services businesses develop simple, effective marketing systems that deliver a steady stream of new prospects.
Visit http://www.smarthinking.com.au or contact Steve Osborne on 0411 713 003
Steve Osborne
 
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Re: Welcome Steve Osborne - Golf and the Art of Marketing

Postby Steve Osborne » Fri Sep 20, 2013 6:27 pm

Thanks Peter, glad you're enjoying my slightly off-base look at how services businesses can see at their marketing in a less confusing way. My view is that it's possible to treat marketing as a system – in the same way we use bookkeeping and accounting systems, customer services systems, even documented sales systems.

Unfortunately, too many of us get caught in the trap of trying to do it all ourselves. Just like the aforementioned, it's possible to outsource much of the hard stuff – like the positioning phase – and just do the enjoyable stuff – the face-to-face side.
Last edited by Steve Osborne on Sun Sep 22, 2013 11:31 am, edited 1 time in total.
Smarthinking helps services businesses develop simple, effective marketing systems that deliver a steady stream of new prospects.
Visit http://www.smarthinking.com.au or contact Steve Osborne on 0411 713 003
Steve Osborne
 
Posts: 12
Joined: Sun Sep 01, 2013 11:51 am

Re: Welcome Steve Osborne - Golf and the Art of Marketing

Postby Steve Osborne » Sun Sep 22, 2013 11:31 am

PUTTING YOUR GAME TOGETHER

We've looked at The Swing/Positioning and each of the shots: Drive/Offer; Approach/Information; Pitch/Engagement; Putt/Response.
And we've looked at what happens in the Clubhouse/Referrals.

Now, let's put the whole game together. The game of golf started out with just 13 rules, but today is governed by many additional regulations.
However, there is one simple statement which gives you the entire philosophy of the Rules of Golf:

“Play the course as you find it, play the ball as it lies, and play fairly.”

Marketing Golf has only 5 rules, but they are a bit tougher.

THE RULES – PENALTIES ABOUND

1. To win at Marketing Golf you must start each hole from the tee – where you don't have a client – and get the ball into the hole on the green, where you have secured that client. The object of the game is to play as many holes as you can handle while making a profit on each one.

2. To successfully play each hole/attract a client, you must play each shot in order. If you skip a shot you automatically forfeit the hole and lose the client.

3. You must play each shot to land on the fairway before you can move onto the next club. Unlike real golf where you simply play again,
if you lose your ball out-of-bounds, in the rough or the water, you forfeit the hole and lose the client.

4. The lie of the ball on the fairway determines which shot you play and whether you can move to the next one. Unlike real golf, it doesn't matter how many shots you play on each hole – no-one but you is keeping score.

5. Each hole you play constitutes one client. You can can simultaneously play as many holes as you can manage, provided you're keeping score on each one. Play the wrong shot at the wrong time and you forfeit the hole and lose the client.

The philosophy of Marketing Golf can be summed up as:

“Play every course as if it were Royal Melbourne, watch your ball because it's easily lost, and expect all the other players to cheat.”

Ask yourself how many shots you would have saved if you never lost your temper, never got down on yourself, always developed a strategy before you hit, and always played within your own capabilities. Jack Nicklaus US golfer
Smarthinking helps services businesses develop simple, effective marketing systems that deliver a steady stream of new prospects.
Visit http://www.smarthinking.com.au or contact Steve Osborne on 0411 713 003
Steve Osborne
 
Posts: 12
Joined: Sun Sep 01, 2013 11:51 am

Re: Welcome Steve Osbourne - Golf and the Art of Marketing

Postby Barbara Gabogrecan » Sun Sep 22, 2013 3:25 pm

Steve, what a marvelous week it has been reading your very interesting posts. It is a shame we have not had more people comment, but I note that you have had over 150 read your posts and this number will continue to grow as more folk visit the Forum and find the time. So I know that you have left your 'mark' on a good many folk.

I have been waiting for someone to ask you the questions you put to us - but as none have, I must admit I am so curious that I am going to ask them and hope you find the time to respond.
What's the key to getting commitment?
And what is two-step promotions?

Thanks again Steve. I will be placing excerpts from your posts into Blog posts of mine, with links back to this Forum.
Warm wishes
Barb
Barbara Gabogrecan assists HBB's to market their business online
http://www.HomeBasedBusinessAustralia.org

Barbara is an artist specialising in silk painting; her video is on page one of You Tube http://youtu.be/1ZA9HObN_Go
http://www.SilkPaintingByGabogrecan.com/

Having survived a stroke and a brain tumour, Barbara wrote a book titled 'Thank God I Had a Stroke' to motivate and inspire others suffering from similar afflictions.
http://GabogrecanStrokeRecovery.com/
Barbara Gabogrecan
 
Posts: 341
Joined: Sun May 03, 2009 12:57 pm

Re: Welcome Steve Osborne - Golf and the Art of Marketing

Postby Steve Osborne » Sun Sep 22, 2013 9:57 pm

Thanks Barb, I've appreciated the opportunity to develop this train of thought and hopefully, I can develop it into something a bit more serious.

The answer to the question of "How do you get commitment?" is as I wrote in the post, "Ask for it." So often, we simply forget to actually ask for the business. Or we assume the deal has been done, when in fact, until the proposal is signed, the terms agreed and the deposit paid there's nothing actually going on.

So the key is: get your prospect to take ACTION.
Last edited by Steve Osborne on Mon Sep 23, 2013 12:31 am, edited 1 time in total.
Smarthinking helps services businesses develop simple, effective marketing systems that deliver a steady stream of new prospects.
Visit http://www.smarthinking.com.au or contact Steve Osborne on 0411 713 003
Steve Osborne
 
Posts: 12
Joined: Sun Sep 01, 2013 11:51 am

Re: Welcome Steve Osborne - Golf and the Art of Marketing

Postby Steve Osborne » Mon Sep 23, 2013 12:11 am

Thanks Barbara, I thought you'd never ask! This is almost a separate topic on its own, but it's very important to understand its importance.

A two step promotion is the opposite of what we've mostly come to view as mainstream advertising. There is no selling involved. The first idea to grasp is this: Quit trying to make a sale with your advertising.

Or to put it another way, stop trying to change someone's mind with an ad. That is, convince them to use your service over the one they currently have. In service businesses, it just won't happen. The reason for this is because there is no such thing as an impulse buy for services.

When was the last time you stopped in for a root canal just because you happened to be driving past the dentist? Or asked an accountant for an impromptu audit? We often make the mistake of confusing our services advertising with what we accept as the "right" way of advertising – what we see on TV. Copying mass media advertising is a common mistake. Service businesses should only use only response marketing tactics.

Here's how mass market ads work. Large companies – let's say car manufacturers – spend a lot of money bringing a product to market, so they look for returns as quickly as possible. They use techniques designed to appeal to small segments but they spread their net very wide. Clearly, only a small number of people are in the market for a new car at any given moment, so the majority of the ad spend is wasted.

We small fish don't have the resources to do ad testing or massive market research. So we make the mistake of trying to cram as much selling info into an ad as possible – either on- or off-line – in the mistaken belief people will buy our stuff because we've mounted a convincing argument. We copy the big spenders. We try to change their minds. What we should really be doing is giving people an experience, a taste of what we do. It's the same principal as the free food sampler in the supermarket, or the free sachet of shampoo through the letterbox. Once the new new service has been sampled, we stand a much greater chance they'll switch.

When you've changed someone's behaviour, their mind will follow.

So you run an ad – not to sell your services – but to sell your giveaway. Yes, you spend money on something you give away for nothing.
Here's how it works.

A campaign is created comprising a series of small-space print and/or online ads containing a free information offer driving people to a landing page or Facebook page. Once there, the prospect fills in a form to receive a download or a service offer to be redeemed online. Either way, the single goal of the campaign is to collect the person's email address. Nothing else.

With that information you now have two very valuable things. One, you know the person is at least somewhat interested in you or your service. Two, you have permission to continue building a relationship with them – sending them more info – until they either say stop or they develop sufficient interest in you to buy something.

That's why it's called two step. Step One is the freebie. Step Two is the relationship. Neither step involves you trying to sell anything. The really great thing is that you're never doing those "icky" sales things, because you only ever market to people who have said "I like you. Send me stuff because I might buy something in future." It's incredibly cost-effective.
Last edited by Steve Osborne on Mon Sep 23, 2013 12:34 am, edited 1 time in total.
Smarthinking helps services businesses develop simple, effective marketing systems that deliver a steady stream of new prospects.
Visit http://www.smarthinking.com.au or contact Steve Osborne on 0411 713 003
Steve Osborne
 
Posts: 12
Joined: Sun Sep 01, 2013 11:51 am

Re: Welcome Steve Osborne - Golf and the Art of Marketing

Postby Steve Osborne » Mon Sep 23, 2013 12:28 am

It's time for my last post. I hope readers have got something out of my golfing analogy and taken my main point: Treat marketing as a game and I'm sure you'll have a lot more fun with it. Serious fun, but if you know where each of your prospects are in the game, you can recognise which shot you should be playing. The rules of Marketing Golf are simple but firm. Like all good games, there is a reward for winning and a penalty for breaking the rules.

IT'S ONLY A GAME

When you play Marketing Golf, you quickly learn to recognise exactly where every prospect is within the game and what you need to do to play your next shot. Now, simply repeat the game with every new prospect.

HOW WELL DO YOU PLAY?

In summary: Each new client you're trying to attract equals playing one hole. To successfully attract new clients you must know which shot to play depending where you are on the course. You must pass every new prospect fully and completely through each shot.

You break the rules by allowing a prospect to skip or jump over clubs without playing a shot. If a shot is skipped, the prospect drops out
of the game. The prospect determines whether the shot has been played and whether you can play the next one. You score additional points
for a referral.

THERE ARE NO 'GIMMIES'

Marketing progresses through a series of steps to get to a sale or repeat sale. The biggest trap is allowing your prospect to skip shots. No matter how much you or the prospect might want to push ahead, you can't skip the shots to get there. If you jump from Drive to Putt without playing your Approach and Pitch, you'll come unstuck every time.

Here's a typical situation. You're a wedding planner. Typically, someone you don't know calls your business out of the blue. "I saw your ad in the paper. I just need a quick quote for 80 people at the beach," they say. "I've got no idea of budget and I need your price by tomorrow." The enquiry sounds kosher and you can't afford to turn away work, so what are your alternative plans for action here?

Ka-ching! The first reaction many would have is to frantically scramble together an estimate using experience and guesswork. And in an effort to appear competitive, shave 10% off the margin. Send off the quote and hope for the best.

WHY NOT AIM FOR A BIRDIE?

But say you win the job. The bride is expecting roses and red carpet treatment, when you've only allowed for the basics. Catering turns into a problem, when the supplier can't deliver the requested course. You're professional, you do the best you can with what you've got and swallow the additional costs to keep the customer happy. But they were expecting one thing and you delivered something else. Something good, but not great. No-one is really satisfied.

They jumped from Drive to Putt in one leap. If you keep your wits during the initial conversation, you can identify where they are in the cycle.

What do they know about us? What are their expectations?

    1 find out info – what are the drivers here? – the 3 card trick*
    2 use your Information Pack – email a report entitled The 7 Things You Cannot Be Without To Ensure Your Beach Wedding Is A Success
    3 refer them to your website showing successful events and glowing testimonials
    4 give a low to high range and don't be dragged into an estimate without satisfying yourself the prospect is a good fit
    5 be prepared to walk away or refer the prospect to someone else if you feel their expectations are either outside your capabilities or putting you into the commodity basket
A prospect MUST pass thru every shot. To not do so invariably leads to dissatisfaction due to an imbalance of expectation. One or both sides will not get the value they expected.

*The three card trick: Every project has 3 drivers – quality, time and price. Pick any two. And of those two, there will always be one main driver. Take our wedding example.

"If you want your wedding next weekend, I can find a local beach for you. I can get truckloads of beautiful flowers in the colours you're after and I can arrange gourmet catering. However, the event will be hugely expensive. If you want a lesser fee, I can use the daisies from my garden and a box of party pies and we can book the local pub. Which of these options do you prefer?"

Golf is a matter of confidence. If you think you cannot do it, there is no chance you will. Henry Cotton English golfer
Smarthinking helps services businesses develop simple, effective marketing systems that deliver a steady stream of new prospects.
Visit http://www.smarthinking.com.au or contact Steve Osborne on 0411 713 003
Steve Osborne
 
Posts: 12
Joined: Sun Sep 01, 2013 11:51 am

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